Le Storie del Carnevale: Pulcinella from Naples

Italian heritage, Italian history, Italy, America, Pulcinella, Naples
Pulcinella always wears a black mask

Pulcinella is an Italian mask which was born in Naples, in the South of Italy, during the second half of the XVI century and invented by actor Silvio Fiorillo, for the Commedia dell' Arte.

The mask recalls characters of Latin fairy tales, such as "pullicinellus", a character created by Horace, and the galletto, who had some physical features which made him look like a cockerel. These are all features that Pulcinella got from the Latin ancestors.

Pulcinella is well known for his clothes: a large shirt, white trousers, black belt and shoes, white hood and a black mask on his face. He is a lazy servant who walks in a weird way, uses lots of gestures and likes to live his life day by day, taking advantage of each single situation, pretending of being poor, rich or a thief, according to the moment. Friendly, talkative, melancholic, and unreliable, all in one single character.



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