Apulia’s Liquid Gold: Fruity, Bitter and a Touch of Spicy

The best harvest method, holds Mr. Lo Monaco, is the traditional one: hand-picking the olives from the plant. “It allows you to pick the fruit at the desired ripeness, in the best conditions, when it is whole, and without it touching the ground,” he explained. Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria

The best harvest method, holds Mr. Lo Monaco, is the traditional one: hand-picking the olives from the plant. “It allows you to pick the fruit at the desired ripeness, in the best conditions, when it is whole, and without it touching the ground,” he explained. Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria

If you’ve ever visited the Apulian countryside, you’ve walked amongst the giants. The majestic ulivi secolari (centuries-old olive trees) have stood the grueling test of time. Imbued with a sage elegance and peaceful tiredness that only comes with old age, these enduring monuments have dominated the Apulian landscape for over 2,700 years. From the Messapi, Romans and Byzantines, to the Angevins, Aragonese and Spanish, these ancient trees have witnessed the rise and fall of one grand civilization after another, and will continue to live on long after we’re gone. There’s a reverence that you feel must be owed to these majestic trees that have lived through it all, not only because of their commanding presence, but also for the liquid gold they have produced for centuries: extra virgin olive oil. 
 
The Apulia region produces almost 40% of Italy’s total olive oil production, and many would argue that it’s of the highest quality in the world. I spoke with Paolo Lo Monaco, collaborator at the Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria, which is owned by his wife, Maria Lubes, and is located in the province of Bari, in the municipalities of Sannicandro di Bari and Acquaviva delle Fonti. He explained what exactly it is about extra virgin olive oil produced in Apulia that distinguishes it from that of other countries. 
Coratina extra virgin olive oil production at the Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria, located in the province of Bari. Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria
To begin with, “extra virgin” olive oil refers to that which is produced without the use of chemical substances or treatments that will deteriorate or alter the oil’s natural acidity. “To obtain said oil, only fresh, high quality olives that are harvested and juiced should be used. [The olives] should not undergo treatment other than washing, separation of leaves, centrifugation and filtration,” explained Mr. Lo Monaco. 
 
Furthermore, an oil is considered “extra virgin” if it has an acidic level of under 1% and does not have any of the twelve defects, which include the possible presence of hay, dirt, mold, or dregs. The best extra virgin olive oils have all three of the following pregi, or positive attributes: fruitiness, bitterness and spiciness. 
 
According to Mr. Lo Monaco, the production of such high quality oil is dependent upon four main factors: the climatic conditions of the zone of production, the kind of olives used, the composition of the soil, and the ripeness of the olives at the time of harvest.
“We use coratina olives,” said Mr. Lo Monaco. “The coratina [olive] was born in Puglia, and is a representation of the region’s true heritage and traditional olive-growing culture. Therefore, the oil that comes from it is a typical product of this region and offers the consumer a guarantee of its origin and authenticity.” Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria
“The first distinctive sign of a high quality extra virgin olive oil is the fruitiness, or the scent that is reminiscent of fruit, which is obtained when an olive is crushed between the fingers,” he explained. This is dependent upon the quality of olives used. “Like flowers, there are those that have a strong scent, and those that you can’t sense at all. Olives are the same,” he said.
 
The bitter and spicy qualities of the extra virgin olive oil, on the other hand, are attributed to the ripeness of the olive when it is harvested. “Olives go through three stages, green, yellow and pink, and black. If you pick [the olives] when they’re green, the more bitter the oil will taste. The closer it gets to black, the more you don’t taste the bitterness,” said Mr. Lo Monaco.
 
The best time to pick the olives is when they’re in transition from yellow to pink. 
 
 The geographic location of Apulia, a strip of land that stretches along the Adriatic sea, lends itself to optimal climatic conditions for olive oil production. The Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria, for example, is located on a piece of land 250 meters above sea level. “The land enjoys a typical Mediterranean climate, with rainfall concentrated in the autumnal and winter periods, followed by average high temperatures that last until the drought in the summer period,” explained Mr. Lo Monaco.
 
Still, there is a significant difference in the flavor found in the olive oil produced in this region of Italy as compared to olive oil produced in other countries, such as Spain, Turkey and Greece, which also reap the benefits of a Mediterranean climate. The difference is in the quality of the olives harvested. 
 
To clarify, almost all olive trees are ulivi secolari. These ancient trees produce a variety of olives that range in quality. 
 
“We use coratina olives,” said Mr. Lo Monaco. “The coratina [olive] was born in Puglia, and is a representation of the region’s true heritage and traditional olive-growing culture. Therefore, the oil that comes from it is a typical product of this region and offers the consumer a guarantee of its origin and authenticity.” Coratina extra virgin olive oil produced by the Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria is of a high quality because it has all three of the defining characteristics (fruitiness, bitterness, and spiciness), and presents none of the twelve defects. Naturally rich in antioxidants, polyphenols and vitamins A, D and E, it also has many health benefits. “Those qualities are almost never found in oils from other countries. The oils from other countries are rather neutral in terms of taste,” said Mr. Lo Monaco. 
 
In addition to the factors mentioned above, there are also a few other things that determine the quality of the extra virgin olive oil, such as the conservation of the oil (it is best if it is consumed in the same year of production), any treatments done on the plants or to the land, the health of the plants, and the technology used to pick the olives. The best harvest method, holds Mr. Lo Monaco, is the traditional one: hand-picking the olives from the plant. “It allows you to pick the fruit at the desired ripeness, in the best conditions, when it is whole, and without it touching the ground,” he explained.
 
Dip a piece of fresh bread into a dish of Coratina extra virgin olive oil, take in the fruitful smell and savor the bitter and spicy notes. If you close your eyes, you might just see yourself driving down an old Apulian road, where blankets of those ancient trees stretch for miles and miles on either side of you. If only we could hear the age-old secrets that lie hidden in the knots of their gnarled tree trunks.
Se avete mai visitato la campagna pugliese, avete camminato fra i giganti. I maestosi ulivi secolari hanno sostenuto la prova estenuante del tempo. Pieni di quell'eleganza sapiente e di quella pacata stanchezza che vengono solamente con la maturità, questi monumenti duraturi hanno dominato il panorama della Puglia per più di 2,700 anni. Dai Messapi, Romani e Bizantini, agli Angioini, Aragonesi e Spagnoli, questi antichi alberi hanno testimoniato la nascita e caduta di grandi civiltà una dopo l’altra, e continueranno a vivere a lungo dopo di noi. C'è una riverenza che si sente di provare davanti a questi alberi maestosi che hanno vissuto attraverso tutto, non solo a causa della loro presenza imponente, ma anche per il liquido dorato che hanno prodotto per secoli: l’olio extra vergine di oliva. 
 
La Puglia produce circa il 40% del totale della produzione olivicola italiana e molti affermerebbero che è della qualità più alta nel mondo. Ho parlato con Paolo Lo Monaco, collaboratore nell’Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria, di proprietà di sua moglie Maria Lubes, e localizzata nella provincia di Bari, nei comuni di Sannicandro di Bari ed Acquaviva delle Fonti. Ha spiegato cosa esattamente caratterizza l’olio extra vergine d’oliva che è prodotto in Puglia e che lo distingue da quello di altri paesi. 
L'olio extra vergine d'oliva si riferisce a quello prodotto senza l'uso di sostanze chimiche o di trattamenti che deteriorano o alterano la naturale acidità dell'olio. Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria
Per cominciare, olio d’oliva "extra vergine" fa riferimento a quello che è prodotto senza l'uso di sostanze chimiche o trattamenti che deteriorerebbero o altererebbero la naturale acidità dell’olio. “Per ottenere detto olio devono essere usate solo olive fresche, di prima qualità, colte e spremute, che non abbiano subito altro trattamento oltre al lavaggio, alla separazione delle foglie, alla centrifugazione e alla filtrazione” ha spiegato Lo Monaco. 
 
Inoltre, un olio è considerato "extra vergine" se ha un livello di acidità sotto l’1% e non ha nessuno dei dodici difetti che includono la possibile presenza di fieno, sporcizia, muffa o residui. I migliori oli di oliva extra vergine hanno tutti e tre i seguenti pregi, o attributi positivi: la fruttosità, l'amarezza e la piccantezza.  
 
Secondo Lo Monaco, la produzione di olio di questa alta qualità dipende da quattro fattori principali: le condizioni climatiche della zona di produzione, il genere delle olive usate, la composizione del suolo, e la maturità delle olive al momento del raccolto. 
"Noi usiamo l'oliva coratina ," ci racconta il signor Lo Monaco. "La coratina nasce in Puglia, rappresentando un vero patrimonio per la regione e per la sua tradizione olivicola. L'olio che ne deriva è quindi un prodotto tipico che nasce in queste terre ed è garanzia di origine e genuinità per il consumatore". Photo courtesy of Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria

 
“Il primo segno distintivo di un olio extravergine di oliva di buona qualità è il fruttato, cioè il profumo che ricorda il frutto, lo stesso che si ottiene schiacciando un’oliva fresca tra le dita” ha spiegato. Questo dipende dalla qualità delle olive usate. "Come i fiori, ci sono quelli che hanno un profumo forte, e quelli che non profumano affatto. Le olive sono la stessa cosa", ha detto. Le caratteristiche di amarezza e speziatura dell’olio extra vergine di oliva, d'altra parte, dipendono dalla maturità dell'oliva quando è raccolta. “Le olive hanno tre stadi: verde, giallo e rosato, e nero. Se scegli le olive quando sono verdi, l’olio risulterà più amaro. Quanto più si avvicinano al nero, tanto più non si sentirà il gusto amaro” ha detto Lo Monaco. Il tempo migliore per raccogliere le olive è quando stanno passando dal giallo al rosa. 
 
L'ubicazione geografica della Puglia, una striscia di terra che si stende lungo il Mare Adriatico, si presta alle condizioni climatiche ottimali per la produzione di olio d’oliva. L'Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria, per esempio, è localizzata su un appezzamento di terreno a 250 metri sopra il livello marittimo. “I terreni godono di un clima tipicamente mediterraneo con piovosità concentrate nel periodo autunnale ed invernale seguito da temperature mediamente alte sino alle siccità nel periodo estivo” ha detto Lo Monaco. 
 
Inoltre, c’è una differenza significativa nel sapore che si trova nell’olio d’oliva prodotto in questa regione dell'Italia se confrontata con gli oli d’oliva prodotti in altri Paesi, come Spagna, Turchia e Grecia che pure beneficiano del clima mediterraneo. La differenza è nella qualità delle olive raccolte.  
 
Per chiarire, quasi tutti gli alberi di ulivo sono ulivi secolari. Questi alberi antichi producono una varietà di olive che variano nella qualità. 
 
“Noi usiamo l’oliva coratina” ha detto Lo Monaco. “La coratina nasce in Puglia, rappresentando un vero patrimonio per la regione e per la sua tradizione olivicola. L’olio che ne deriva è quindi un prodotto tipico che nasce in queste terre ed è garanzia di origine e genuinità per il consumatore”. 
 
L’olio extra vergine d’oliva coratina prodotta dall’Azienda Agricola Lubes Maria è di alta qualità perchè ha tutte e tre le caratteristiche importanti (fruttosità, amarezza, e piccantezza), e non presenta nessuno dei dodici difetti. Naturalmente ricco in antiossidanti, polifenoli e vitamine A, D ed E, ha anche molti benefici salutari. “Quasi mai ci sono quei pregi negli oli di altri Paesi. Gli altri oli sono piuttosto neutri” ha detto Lo Monaco.  
 
Oltre ai fattori menzionati sopra, ci sono altre cose che determinano la qualità dell’olio extra vergine d’oliva, come la conservazione dell’olio (è migliore se è consumato nello stesso anno di produzione), qualsiasi trattamento fatto sulla pianta o alla terra, la salute delle piante, e la tecnologia usata per raccogliere le olive. Il miglior metodo di raccolto, sostiene Lo Monaco, è quello tradizionale: raccolta a mano delle olive dalla pianta. “Consente di cogliere il frutto al grado di maturazione voluto, nelle migliori condizioni, integro e senza che sia venuto a contatto con il terreno” ha detto. 
 
Affondate un pezzo di pane fresco in un piatto di olio extra vergine d’oliva Coratina, annusatene il profumo fruttato, il tono amaro e le note speziate. Se chiudete gli occhi, probabilmente vi vedrete guidare lungo le vecchie strade pugliesi dove distese di questi antichi alberi ricoprono per miglia e miglia le strade da entrambi i lati.  
 
…Se solo potessimo ascoltare i segreti antichi che giacciono nascosti nei nodi dei loro tronchi nodosi.

Receive More Stories Like This In Your Inbox

SPONSORED

Recommended

Venice Glass Week: breaking the mould in Murano

Wander the back streets of Murano and you can hear the roar of furnaces behind blind factory walls. The air trembles and there’s a perpetual orange...

A Journey to Porto Ercole, Caravaggio's “Last Resort”

There is a place in southern Tuscany, just near the border with the Lazio region, to which vacationers, as well as art historians and culture lovers...

Partinico and Alcamo, Sicily: poetic path to Via Frank Zappa

Ironically enough, musical genius Frank Zappa and a 13th century poet, Cielo d’Alcamo, had some important things in common. These artists so vastly...

What did the Romans do for us?

Throughout history, civilizations have come and gone from the Italian peninsula, each one leaving its mark. From the Etruscans’ stonework to Greek...

Tradition, and good, old fashioned habits can make you 100: at least in Italy

Italy is becoming a country of old men and women. Or is it? True, Il Bel Paese does have the lowest natality rates of the continent, with only 7.8...

Weekly in Italian

Recent Issues