Delicious fiori di zucca

In sunny months, Rome’s markets brim with orange-and-green zucchini blossoms. Romans stuff these fiori di zucca with a bit of melty cheese, frying them until crisp.

Traditional fritto misto is a mix of fiori di zucca (zucchini flower), crisped meats, olive ascolane (stuffed olives), and mozzarelline fritte (mozzarella balls). Both elegant and rustic restaurants serve Rome’s fried antipasto staple.

You’ll find below our Roman-approved recipe for fiori di zucca. In the U.S., flowers can be found at farmers’ markets in late spring and summer.   

 

INGREDIENTS

* 2-3 eggs

* 1 cup flour

* 10-15 zucchini flowers

* 4 tablespoons of beer

* Oil, sufficient for frying

*1 ball of fresh mozzarella, sliced into strips

Remove the prickly stem of the flower. Place a slice of mozzarella in each flower. Do not over-stuff. Set aside the filled flowers. In a frying pan, heat 3-4 inches of oil to 375 degrees. Then, beat the eggs with a fork. Sift in the flour, stirring to avoid clumps. Whisk the beer in until the coating resembles a thick pancake batter.

Dip the flowers in the batter one by one, letting extra coating drip off. Fry the blossoms for 3-4 minutes per batch — no more than four at a time. Let the oil reheat to 375 after each frying. Flowers should be golden and crisp on all sides. Sprinkle with salt and eat right away.  

 

You’re not tasting Rome until you taste this deep-fried deliciousness.

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