For all Nutella lovers around the world

Chocolate hazelnut spread

Nutella® was invented by Piedmont pastry maker Pietro Ferrero. Today is one of the most famous Italian food around the world.
History tells that Nutella was created during the Second World War, when finding cocoa was almost impossible due to the shortage of supplies. 
Pietro Ferrero thought of creating a mixture of hazelnuts, sugar and just a touch of cocoa. He called ‘Giandujot’ paste, Turin’s popular carnival mask. Its thick consistency made it easy to cut into slices and eat with bread. After a while, the delicious ‘Giandujot' paste was transformed into a new product that could be easily spread on bread: it was called SuperCrema, a precursor of the Original Nutella®. Everybody loves Nutella®, so if you want a full immersion of chocolate, hazelnut and sugar, just go to Chicago in the Millennium Park Plaza, in the east of the city, because on May 31 this year opened the first "Nutella Café" in the world. The experience is “Delicious”, the design of the cafè will make you feel like living in a real nutella jar! You can`t miss it! 

We have much more curiosity and secret about Italian culture on our web site check it out!  

 

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